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dc.contributor.authorWiersema, Jan R.
dc.contributor.authorVerguts, Tom
dc.contributor.authorGasthuys, Roots
dc.contributor.authorvan Der Meere, Jacob J.
dc.contributor.authorRooyers, Herbert
dc.contributor.authorSonuga-Barke, Edmund
dc.contributor.authorMetin, Baris
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-12T15:18:31Z
dc.date.available2014-12-12T15:18:31Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.citationMetin, B., Wiersema, J.R., Verguts, T., Gasthuys, R., van Der Meere, J.J., Roeyers, H., & Sonuga-Barke, E. (2014): Event rate and reaction time performance in ADHD: Testing predictions from the state regulation deficit hypothesis using an ex-Gaussian model, Child Neuropsychology: A Journal on Normal and Abnormal Development in Childhood and Adolescence,tr_TR
dc.identifier.urihttp://earsiv.uskudar.edu.tr/xmlui/handle/123456789/406
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25482092
dc.description.abstractAccording to the state regulation deficit (SRD) account, ADHD is associated with a problem using effort to maintain an optimal activation state under demanding task settings such as very fast or very slow event rates. This leads to a prediction of disrupted performance at event rate extremes reflected in higher Gaussian response variability that is a putative marker of activation during motor preparation. In the current study, we tested this hypothesis using ex-Gaussian modeling, which distinguishes Gaussian from non-Gaussian variability. Twenty-five children with ADHD and 29 typically developing controls performed a simple Go/No-Go task under four different event-rate conditions. There was an accentuated quadratic relationship between event rate and Gaussian variability in the ADHD group compared to the controls. The children with ADHD had greater Gaussian variability at very fast and very slow event rates but not at moderate event rates. The results provide evidence for the SRD account of ADHD. However, given that this effect did not explain all group differences (some of which were independent of event rate) other cognitive and/or motivational processes are also likely implicated in ADHD performance deficits.tr_TR
dc.description.sponsorshipThe research has been conducted at Ghent University, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences. This study is supported by the Fund for Scientific Research Flanders.tr_TR
dc.language.isoengtr_TR
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSCI-E;
dc.relation.isversionof10.1080/09297049.2014.986082tr_TR
dc.subjectADHDtr_TR
dc.subjectex-Gaussian modeltr_TR
dc.subjectReaction timetr_TR
dc.subjectState regulation deficittr_TR
dc.subjectEvent ratetr_TR
dc.titleEvent rate and reaction time performance in ADHD: Testing predictions from the state regulation deficit hypothesis using an ex-Gaussian modeltr_TR
dc.typeArticletr_TR
dc.relation.journalChild Neuropsychologytr_TR
dc.contributor.departmentÜsküdar Üniversitesi, İnsan ve Toplum Bilimleri Fakültesi, Psikoloji Bölümütr_TR
dc.contributor.authorIDTR204094tr_TR


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